wild tanganyukans

Discussion in 'Great Rift Valley Cichlids' started by jano, Jan 11, 2007.

  1. jano
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    jano Noob

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    Hi All Tang freeks.

    Here are a list of wild caught fish that you can order.Looking at bringing them in next week.
    Altolamprologus black calvus
    compressiceps golden head
    bentochromis tricoti
    callochromis macrops nundo
    callochromis pleurospilus
    cyathopharynx foai utinta
    frontosa samazi 15 - 20 cm
    eretmodus zambia
    juli ornatus zambia
    regani
    lamprichthys tanganicadus
    microlepiditus
    daffodils
    opthamotilapia nasuta gold
    optha nasuta tiger
    optam ventralis nundo and samazi
    petrochromis famula red dorsal
    petrochromis kasumbe
    petrochromis moshi yellow
    tropheus duboisi maswa
    tropheus ikola
    tropheus katonga
    tropheus red rainbow
    xenotilapia flavipinis
    xenotilapia ochrogennys

    Let me know if you need info and prices.
    Jano
     
  2. Andre
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    Andre Green fingers

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    Wow Jano

    Those are some really cool fish.

    I have been looking for some black calvus for a while. If you get any I would like to book some.
     
  3. jano
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    jano Noob

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    Hi Andre

    If you whant so black calvus We can bring them for you.The Black calvus are going for about 8 dollard each plus airfreight and clearing cost.

    Jano
     
  4. Pedro
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    Pedro Algae harvester

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    Jano!

    :yes

    All I can say is "You're the man!" :thumb:

    I can't wait to get some of these guys. I'm drooling and dribbling all over the place!

    :worthy Thanks again!
     
  5. henk hugo
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    henk hugo Noob

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    which of those are shellies that i can keep in a 50cm?
     
  6. Andre
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    Andre Green fingers

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    AFAIK none of them.

    Jano - I really want some of the Black calvus - please let me know when etc.
     
  7. Pedro
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    Pedro Algae harvester

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    One of the species I have asked for with this order - which I'm still not sure that they can source - is Neolamprologus caudopunctatus. Its also a shellie and a few of them would probably do just fine in a 50cm.

    Will let you know if they can be sourced.
     
  8. Andre
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    Andre Green fingers

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    Shees, those are nice, I would also like some if Jano can source them.
     
  9. henk hugo
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    henk hugo Noob

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    :wow i'll take some as well :worthy :yes :maca
     
  10. Pedro
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    Pedro Algae harvester

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    You're right Andre - they're very nice indeed! I hope they can be sourced. Have asked for 5 or 6 of them.

    Check out the pictures below © Michael Persson

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. City bowl
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    City bowl Noob

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    Neolamprologus caudopunctatus by Marc Elieson
    N. caudopunctatus is a dwarf cichlid from Lake Tanganyika. It has a silvery-beige colored body, accented only by a distinctive, goldish-orange dorsal fin and blue eyes. Its tail fin and flanks have pearly spots that are visible if the light hits them at the correct angle. These spots that spatter the tails of both males and females have earned it the name caudopunctatus, meaning "spotted tail."

    Despite being a monomorphic species, there are a few subtle traits that can help you distinguish males from females. Males will usually attain a length of 3.5 inches (9 cm) while females are significantly smaller at 2.5 inches (6.5 cm). Males also tend to show a slightly more intense coloration than the females. In addition to their larger size, males can also sometimes be differentiated from females by the presence of red on the upper, outer edge of their tail fins. Males are certainly more aggressive than their counterpart, unless she is tending to eggs or fry, in which case, neither the male nor other tank mates are allowed too close to her or her territory.

    This species is only found along the Zambian coast, at a depth of just 6 feet. In the tank, they need rocks to provide crevices for shelter and for a spawning site. If shells are provided, it’s possible they may use these as spawning sites, even though they won’t live in them like true shell-dwellers. Upside-down clay pots work well as spawning sites too. Just be sure to enlarge the drain hole to accommodate both the male and the female.

    One attribute that makes N. caudopunctatus particularly pleasing is that it is constantly patroling the tank with its fins erect, as if permanently on display. Not only is it quite active, but it’s also a rather peaceful cichlid species. It frequently flares its fins at conspecifics, but these episodes are almost always more out of show than out of malice. When this fish gets excited or stressed, dark, vertical wedge-shaped bars become more distinct along the top portion of its flank. These make a nice contrast to its usually plain, yet beautiful, creamy-silver body. Because of their small size, a matched pair can be kept successfully in a 20-gallon tank.

    As already mentioned, in the wild, N. caudopunctatus lives over a sandy substratum. Sand is likewise recommended as the substrate of choice for the aquarium. They enjoy playing with the sand, sculpting it and moving it around "“ not as much as true shellies do; nevertheless, they do their fair share of restructuring.

    Courtship and spawning begins by the pair preparing a nest. Once a secluded spot has been selected (usually near a rock unless using a flowerpot or shell), they will begin digging a hole. They then proceed to dig a hole in the center of the sand pile created by the excavated sand, creating a semi-circular rim around the entrance of the secluded spawning site. Needless to say, spawning is a secretive affair. The female will attach her eggs to either the sides of the flowerpot/shell or against the rock next to the nest. The male is then banished and she takes up vigil over the eggs, constantly fanning them with her pectoral fins.

    Broods number between 40 and 60 young, with hatching occurring after just 72 hours. Fry become free-swimming 8-10 days post-fertilization. Young should be fed their own specialized entrée of fry food, including Daphnia, Cyclops, or freshly hatched Brine Shrimp. Crushed flake food is accepted after about two weeks of development.

    In the wild, their natural food consists of invertebrates and zooplankton. Adults greatly appreciate Cyclops, Mysis, Daphnia, or Brine Shrimp in addition to a good quality flake food. ?
     
  12. Ryan
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    Ryan Green fingers

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    The standard 20 gallon tank in the article that Gerald posted is a 75cm long tank. I would definitely not keep caudopunks in anything smaller than that, if there's one thing I've learned about shellies it's that they need their space. My occies have decided that the tank that they're in isn't big enough anymore, so they're starting to get a bit more aggro with each other than usual. I had to put a tank divider in to stop the two biggest males from liplocking.

    The only shellies that would be suitable for a 50cm tank is a proven pair of Neolamprologus brevis. Nick James had quite a nice batch of them a while back. They defend very small territories and a mated pair will actually cohabit (share) shells when they're breeding.
     
  13. Pedro
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    Pedro Algae harvester

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    Hi Jano,

    I was contacted last week in regards to the wild caught Tanganyikans.

    Unfortunately, the pricing for the wild caughts was a bit too elevated for my humble pocket and I decided against sourcing any. What made the price a tad high was the transport & clearing fees which made the price per fish very unreasonable.

    Its sad that the pricing was so elevated for wild caughts from the lake considering that the same species can be sourced from China or south east Asian countries for a fraction of the price, as an example, whereas a Cyp. leptosoma would cost roughly R100 per fish from the lake, they can be sourced for +/- R30 per fish from China or south east Asian countries.

    I know that the quantities that have to be purchased from these regions are roughly 6 boxes (with +/- 100 fish in each box) , but this is an avenue that I am seriously considering and investigating. From my calculations, 600 fish would cost roughly R10K including shipping, handling and clearance fees.

    It would be nice if more interested parties would consider getting a shipment like this from China or south east Asian countries even if the species procured are not specifically only Tanganyikans, but other species which are of interest, i.e. Killi's, South Americans, Plecos, etc...

    Thanks for putting me in contact with the person, but this time procuring these species are way out of my financial range.

    Please do let me know if you come across anything else though in the meanwhile. Also, have any of the fish you bred matured enough to be sold/traded?

    Thanks in advance.
     

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