Not sure if this is a problem... But HELP!

Discussion in 'Plant Problems' started by Kryo, Nov 27, 2013.

  1. Kryo
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    Kryo Green fingers

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    Hi Guys

    I was doing some maintenance today and saw these tiny black spots all over the glosso and gravel. On further investigation there seems to be a number of them on the other plants in the tank as well.

    Here is a pic:

    [​IMG]

    Is this the start of an algae outbreak? It is not snails as I don't have any in the tank...

    Help!!!!

    Thanks in advance!

    Cher
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 11, 2014
  2. Sir Bob Roberts
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    Sir Bob Roberts Green fingers

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    get a magnifying glass or take a sample to someone who has one.
    I had an outbreak of small snails which I thought were just small white spots 9could not see with the naked eye.
    keep your eye on one and see if it ever moves
     
  3. Kryo
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    Kryo Green fingers

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    Nope they don't move so definitely not snails. Under a microscope they look like small round beads, like poppy seeds just 10x smaller.
     
  4. Sir Bob Roberts
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    Sir Bob Roberts Green fingers

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    [glow=red,2,300]WOW[/glow] now I'm really [move]interested![/move]
     
  5. ShaunsAquariums
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    ShaunsAquariums Noob

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    I believe these are what are called Black Pepper Spots which basically is the name given to algae that is starting to grow. Try to control your nutrients in your water if algae does start to grow you may need to take bigger steps to stop the growth.

    I would wait to see what it is before taking too much action.

    Hope this helps
     
  6. Luis Embalo
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    Luis Embalo Valued Contributor

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    Nutrients does not cause algae.. too much light and not enough CO2 (or unbalanced) does.

    If you not dosing ferts, do so, and if no pressurized CO2 decrease the lighting period and intensity.
     
  7. Kryo
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    Kryo Green fingers

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    I'm dosing Tropica ferts, nitrates separately (currently stable at 10ppm). Phos is coming from feedings (currently 0,5mg/l). Pressurized CO2 at 7bps which makes the drop checker a nice lime green. Lighting 2x 150w MH's (8000k) at 7hours per day. The bulbs are due for a change in 2mths time.

    I don't think it's algae or snails. Some sites say it could be visible bacteria.....????

    I just found this and mine looks identicle http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/general-aquarium-plants-discussions/51985-what-black-spots-glossostigma-elatinoides.html. They also seem unsure as to what it is....

    I was just thinking, do you think a house bug like a Christmas Beetle or another sort of bug could have laid eggs in the water and they sunk down to the bottom? I have been battling all sorts of flying bugs that have landed in the tank recently...?
     
  8. Kryo
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    Kryo Green fingers

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    Forgot to mention the CO2 comes on 1 hour before the lights go on and goes off 1 hour after lights off.
     
  9. ShaunsAquariums
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    ShaunsAquariums Noob

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    These are known as Pepper Spots they are the beginning of algae growth but I may be wrong. I have had this happen before and it was due to my CO2 levels being reduced.

    Hope this helps but I may be wrong dependant on if whats on that picture is what you have.
     
  10. tyronegenade
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    tyronegenade Specialist

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    Remove some glosso and put the spots under a microscope or magnifying glass and have a closer look. What I see in the other thread doesn't look like algae but it certainly isn't a snail either. A fungus perhaps?

    Very interesting...
     
  11. Taariq
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    Taariq Noob

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    Your people are right about 1 thing... it is pepper spots as in the beginning of this:
    Image of Black Beard Algea

    Image

    This type of algae appears as short hairs, usually a couple of cm long closely packed together. Appears dark green, black, or dark red. It usually grows on plant leaves, and sometimes on decorations/substrate. It is usually found around the edges of plant leaves.

    Causes -

    A) Low CO2 levels
    B) High PO4 levels

    Solutions -

    1) Increase the CO2 levels through a CO2 system or using flourish excel (a carbon supplement)
    2) Lower PO4 levels, by doing a 40% water change, adjusting the PO4 dosing to your tank or increasing your KNO3 levels
    3) Using Flourish Excel, especially above the recommended amount.

    As stated above, the most effective way of treating this algae is to increase CO2 levels in the tank. It could be that you are not able to invest in a pressurised setup, so please check Bob's DIY CO2 tips, which is effective on tanks around the 150lt mark. One successful way of getting rid of this algae is to use Seachems Flourish Excel. This contains an isomer of glutaraldehyde which is a colourless liquid with a pungent odour used to sterilize medical and dental equipment. Dosing this has been successful for many aquarists including myself, and is probably the easiest way to get rid of this algae.
     
  12. wolf
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    wolf Valued Contributor

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    Should your CO2 not go off 1 our before the lights go of and not 1 after
     
  13. Hanekka
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    Hanekka Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi guys, I know this is an old thread...

    I've noticed the same little "poppy seeds" on some of my plants, rocks and wood.
    CO[sub]2[/sub] is at the point where, if I increase it any further, the fish will hate me. (CO[sub]2[/sub] checker is just hitting the green)
    PO[sub]4[/sub] = 1.5 Mg/L (I think that's about 5 ppm?)

    I recently added another set of lights, so a total of 4 running now.

    Also double dosing Excel every second day.

    Any suggestions?
     
  14. tyronegenade
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    tyronegenade Specialist

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    1.5 Mg/L is 1.5 ppm.

    If your CO2 is just "hitting the green" then you can still increase it a little. What you need to know is your KH and pH and you can work out what the free CO2 levels are.
    [​IMG]
    CO2 becomes toxic from about 25--30 ppm.

    Your KH test solution (that is now green) is KH 4 and pH 4. This solution will have CO2 levels above 25 long before a tank that is running at pH 7. (In fact, a KH 4 solution at pH 4 would have 12000 ppm.) On the other hand, a KH 4 solution at pH 7 would only have 12 ppm CO2. If the pH drops to 6.7 then you may have problems... So, what is your KH and pH? Bare in mind, the issue may not be CO2 concentration but CO2 supply. Take a syringe, put a little methylene blue in it. Stick a stretch of airline on the end and then pump a sinlge drop of methylene blue into the area with the algae. Does the drop quickly disperse or hang around? Now put a drop in an area where there is no algae but good plant growth. How does the drop behave now? If it isn't moving as fast in the algae zone then you need to increase water circulation.
     
  15. Hanekka
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    Hanekka Moderator Staff Member

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    Ok. So my pH is 6.5 and my KH is 4. That gives me 38 on the chart below.

    And I just did the "flow" test, but using Herbtana (as I needed to dose anyway). At the back of the tank I have excellent flow. In the front (especially low and close to the subrate) I have very little flow.

    So I can definitely do something about the flow in the tank.

    The algae is on so many different places in the tank, some in areas with good flow, some in areas with almost no flow. :scratch:
     

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