help raising brine shrimp

Discussion in 'D.I.Y.' started by alvin, Jan 22, 2008.

  1. alvin
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    alvin Noob

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    hi folks
    trying my hand at raising brine shrimp and need some help. firstly, after the eggs have hatched does one still need to keep bubbling air into the solution if one wants to raise them to adults? secondly, what is the best food to raise the brine shrimp on to increase their protein value?. thirdly, do they still need the light on after they have hatched? help please :iamwithstupid:
     
  2. Ryan
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    Ryan Green fingers

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    Alvin, as far as I know, brine shrimp are most nutritious when they are babies and still have their egg sacks attached. Adult brine shrimp are fun for larger fish to catch, but don't really offer much in the way of nutrition.
     
  3. Gerry
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    Gerry Noob

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    If you can get a copy of Discus - The Naked Truth by Abdrew Soh - he has a section devoted to raising brine shrimp on a commercial basis.
    He is very informatine and if I remember correctly he feeds with kelp powder - the trick is how much and how often.
    They sell the live adults in large quantities (in Singapore)
     
  4. Andre
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    Andre Green fingers

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    Hey Alvin

    As Ryan said, the shrimps are most nutritious when they have just hatched. They are the best food that you can feed fry (once they are big enough) as the movement of the baby shrimp triggers the fish's hunting instincts. The egg yolk is also very nutritious and contains many amino and fatty acids that are essential for the growth of the fry.

    Growing them to adulthood is a pain. If you want to feed your adult fish brineshrimp rather buy some of the frozen blisterpacks at your LFS
     
  5. alvin
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    alvin Noob

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    andre, ryan and gerry, tks for the help :thumb:
    i was hoping to raise the naupli to adult size to feed to my bigger fish. from all the info i gathered, the naupli are the best food for fry as they contain a greater percentage of fat. But, in my case, i was hoping to feed the naupli some sort of food that would now start increasing their protein content as this is more beneficial for the bigger fish. yeast is ok to feed the naupli but does nothing in terms of protein content. hence i may as well feed my bigger fish commercial food. as for the blister packs their protein content is seldom more than 5 percent. i could try experimenting with beef heart and the likes but i like the idea of a self sustaining food source. i will keep u guys posted if i come across something.
    tks again
     
  6. Andre
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    Andre Green fingers

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    The problem with brineshrimp is that most of their bodymass is made up out of and water and they can only hold a finite amount of protein in their bodies. All of the decent commercially available frozen brine shrimp are fed on protein and vitamins to ensure that they have a good percentage of these when sold.

    IMO you should use brine shrimp as an addition to their normal diet to ensure that your fish get a balanced diet and not as a protein staple food.
     
  7. alvin
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    alvin Noob

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    tks again for the advice andre.
     
  8. Gerry
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    Gerry Noob

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    I found the article on brine shrimp - the food is spirulina. The article is detailed and the
    process is not simple - if you really want quantities (they farm about 20kg per day)
    If you want the details email me geralds@iafrica.com
     
  9. Andre
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    Andre Green fingers

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    No problem
    No problem :)
     
  10. Zombie
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    Zombie Noob

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  11. Discus
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    Discus Algae harvester

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    I've raised them to adulthood on feedings with baking yeast! Not sure how nutritionally useful it was, but they grew on it.
    Inve make good culture foods and enrichment diets - not sure where you'd get hold of them around here though - Dirk might know.

    http://www.inve.com/INVE+Aquaculture+He ... .aspx/1082
     
  12. Discus
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    Discus Algae harvester

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    Incidentally, upside down old coke bottles with the bottom sawn off make quite good culture vessels for small quantities, as do rain gauges.
     

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