DIY decholinator

Discussion in 'D.I.Y.' started by dougbb, Oct 9, 2008.

  1. dougbb
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    dougbb Algae harvester

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    I have been thinking for a while at what exactly dechlorinator is and would it be easy to make. So far I have found that the active ingredient is Sodium thiosulphate which would take up the chlorine as well as remove the Cl from chloramine, that would just leave some ammonia behind which in a cycled tank should not be a problem.

    Does anyone else know what else they put in? Mine doesnt say anything with regards to ingredients.
    Im picking up some sodium thiosulphate from wits this afternoon hopefully.

    Also getting a CO2 drop checker made but will post another thread regarding that and a CO2 diffuser a bit later
     
  2. Andre
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    Andre Green fingers

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    Hi Doug

    If you don't have any chloramine in your water the easiest way to dechlorinate the water is to aerate it for a while.

    I normally just run a tap at high velocity into a bucket and add the water straight to my tank. That being said my house's water does not have a lot of chlorine by the time it reaches my tap. At my parent's house I can smell the chlorine escaping.
     
  3. Headbanger
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    Headbanger Noob

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    Water Ager.

    For the removal of chlorine from tap water so it can be used immediately in the aquarium

    Sodium Thiosulfate 24.00%
    Quinine Sulfate 0.04%
    Distilled Water 75.96%

    Add eight drops per Gallon Be sure water is 78’ to 80’ for tropical fish. Equalize temperature for gold fish to avoid shocking them WATER AGER also contains Quinine a colourless recognized prophylatic for ich a desese often encountered after fish are transferred or chilled.
     
  4. BigFish
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    BigFish Noob

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    @dougbb (trying to be the wicked chemist)

    I use 100g per 2000ml in an old aqua plus dispenser (found some calculator ages back on a koi web site). Let me know how much you plan to use.Agree with the ammonia warning

    The sodium thio.. as anti-chlorine leaves behind ammonia when reacting with the chloramines--->> which means a big NO NO for new setups with fish.
    You dont want to add to the ammonia level in an uncycled tank! In a planted tank the plants should be happy
    (walstad)

    I also aerate the water in 120l drums for a week before water changes (aquariums).On the "pond" i just add the sodium thio.. in the pond then add water in at pressure.

    Other anti-chlorines may have EDTA which is a chelating agent (binds to the heavy metals if there are any in the tap water)

    Others have aloe extract ("supposed" to help with healing).

    and we can go on...
     
  5. dougbb
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    dougbb Algae harvester

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    hi thanks for that headbanger. I will leave out the quinine as that is not really needed but is nice as prophylaxis i guess.
    So i got 500g of the sodium thiosulfate...hmmm so that should make about 2liters of the solution...which is how many drops? 1 drop is prob about a tenth of a mil or maybe a bit more..but ten is a nice number so i have 2000ml = 20000drops /8 = 2500 gallons which is 11365 liters of water...ok so maybe 500g was overkill...but hey if not why not.

    Andre: i do the same for my 1ft tank, turn tap on full so it sprays everywhere bounces out of basin and hits me in the groin area leaving an embarrassing wet mark on my pants...then i turn tap down and fill a glass jug so that the water 'foams' a little and then throw that into tank so far have no ill effects.
    The problem with my other tanks is that i cant fit the large buckets into the basin and the bath pipe is super large so it fills the bucket quickly but at a low pressure. With me being me i dont have a set day i do water changes as my work and varsity time table fluctuates, so its always a spur of the moment thing.
     
  6. dougbb
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    dougbb Algae harvester

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    @bigfish im not too sure how much i will use, i think i will try find randwaters water parameters, from there see how much chlorine is in the water, then double it because i dont think its a constant amount, supposed to vary according so amount of spores and bacteria they pick up in testing. From there i will see how much the sodiumthiosulphate can bind...hmmm this feels a lot like a first year chem problem...but ill try figure it out. I think the thio... is also supposed to bind some heavy metals but not 100% sure.
     
  7. BigFish
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    BigFish Noob

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    Found the web site

    http://www.cnykoi.com/calculators/calcstdose.asp

    Watch out for sodium thio.. . Some guy overseas overdosed on sodium thio.. in his pond & they had a heat wave . The decrease in O2 ( because of the heat + something about sodium thio.. decomposition) caused his fish to die.

    Other links
    http://www.koi-bito.com/forum/general-k ... #post10144

    stuff on sodium thio...

    Warning to all reading this post.....
    Do your own declor at your own risk ;D. (i.e dont complain if your R3/R300/R3000 fish dies)
     
  8. Andre
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    Andre Green fingers

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    No problem dougbb.

    Something else to consider is that chlorine levels in the water will raise the ORP/redox potential of the water. So long as this level remains below 400mV your fish should be fine.

    What I am saying is that a little bit of chlorine might not be that bad for your fish, so long as the amounts stay within reason.

    ORP levels are a good way to test the health of your aquariums.
     
  9. dougbb
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    dougbb Algae harvester

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    ...To ask a newb question...how do i measure orp...?
     
  10. Gerry
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    Gerry Noob

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    The easiest way to get rid of chlorine is to run the water in under pressure to create bubbles. The chlorine is a gas and comes off quite quickly.
    I queried with Cape Town water quality a year or so ago and they do not use chloramine, which is more difficult to remove than chlorine. I do not know whether chloramine is used anywhere in South Africa

    The use of Sodium Thiosulphate is fine if you stick to the correct dose. You can kill your fish by using too much. The addition of Quinine Sulphate is not needed and also Quinine is extremely expensive - if you can get it. One can buy quinine tablets.

    Sodium thiosulphate solution is available from A White Chemist in Plein Street, Cape Town.
     

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