Buffer Fish for Rosy Loaches

Discussion in 'Schooling Fish' started by Norio De Sousa, May 15, 2018.

  1. Norio De Sousa
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    Norio De Sousa Green fingers

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    I've got 11 or so Rosy Loaches and, since I gave away my neon tetras, they've become very shy. I almost never see them.

    I read that adding buffer fish could help. The shy fish can then feel secure because the buffer fish aren't freaking out and hiding all the time.

    It's so bad that even my Otos and Pygmy Cories are a bit skittish now. It's almost like they've learned from the Rosies.

    Anyhow, I was thinking of getting some buffer fish. Not Neons. Probably rasbora of some kind or maybe rainbows.

    Right now I have 5 Pseudomugil Getrudae that I'll give away and then I hope to add 6-10 of the new buffer fish.

    Any suggestions?

    I'm thinking of getting 10 of one of these:
    • Kubotai
    • Chili Rasbora
    • Golden White Cloud Minnows
    I really don't like Tetras. Their behaviour is too boring. So ideally fish that are active and especially fish that aren't shy and have some kind of interesting mating ritual as that's usually fun to watch (like with the Gertrudae)

    Thanks!
     
  2. TheGrissom
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    TheGrissom Green fingers

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    Harlequin rasbora are always nice. I really enjoyed watching mine swim against the current and then turn and ride it back to the other end. Unfortunately this behaviour stopped as they got older.
     
  3. Norio De Sousa
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    Norio De Sousa Green fingers

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    Thanks! Definitely gonna consider Harlequins. Very nice fish. Did you find that they schooled well? Or at least shoaled?
     
  4. TheGrissom
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    TheGrissom Green fingers

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    When they were young they schooled quite nicely. Once they got older each fish kinda did its own thing. The whole school used to chase each other through the vallis for hours when newly bought
     
  5. TankMaster
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    TankMaster Noob

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    An important thing to note is that these are SHOALING fish and not SCHOOLING fish.

    Here's a quote from our friend Wikipedia

    "In biology, any group of fish that stay together for social reasons are shoaling (pronounced /ˈʃoʊlɪŋ/), and if the group is swimming in the same direction in a coordinated manner, they are schooling"

    Kind of an intersting observation. Most fish tend to change behaviour when food is plentiful and predators are non existent. They don't really have a reason to shoal anymore. Put them in a new tank and they will instinctively shoal.

    To the OP, Did you consider topwater fish like pencilfish and hatchetfish? Similar water parameters...
     
  6. TheGrissom
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    TheGrissom Green fingers

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    Thanks for the info. I was always under the impression that schooling was when there was only one species of fish whereas shoaling was multiple species of fish. Will keep that in mind for future.
     
  7. TheGrissom
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    TheGrissom Green fingers

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    So then my previous post is not correct

    Its actually shoaling behavior then
     
  8. TankMaster
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    TankMaster Noob

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    That is correct.

    This is also seen in Discus and Corydoras for example.

    That's why we've always been told to keep corys in groups.

    In the wild, some Otocinclus species are found mixed in groups of corydoras. That is more a symbiotic relationship than social shoaling. Otocinclus (not specifically Affinis) have similar coloration to some corys that they are found with. Since corys have very few natural predators, the otos can mimic corys and save themselves from being eaten by larger cichlids.

    It's a confusing term and I also mix up the two sometimes. It just depends who you speak to. Rather use the incorrect term and not correct someone who'll argue with you.



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